Broadside No. 12 – Kate Elliot

Ahoy there me mateys!  Welcome to the twelfth broadside – the Kate Elliott edition.  She has written over 25 novels.  I have read 12 of them – 3 complete series and two partial series that are still being written.  I loved all of these novels though I have me favorites.

Please note: All book descriptions are taken directly from the author’s website and the book title links lead to Goodreads.

Jaran series

This is the series that made me fall in love with the author.  I got it from a library back in the day.  The item that struck me most in this novel was how strong the main character, Tess Soerensen, was.  This was back when finding strong female protagonists in sci-fi wasn’t the easiest.  The world building was exquisite.  Even though it is a sci-fi, the Jaran culture is seemingly primitive in nature.  I love this exploration of the various cultures.  And all of the novels in this series are available in an e-omnibus format.  So win!

The series blurb by the author:

The Novels of the Jaran (1: Jaran, 2: An Earthly Crown, 3: His Conquering Sword, 4: The Law of Becoming) are science fiction with elements of planetary romance and space opera blended into my long time interest in anthropology and the study of how empires rise, sustain themselves, and fall. I flippantly call the first book Jane Austen meets Genghis Khan, in a society that is not a matriarchy but in which women have real authority, both public and private, within their specific spheres of influence. The later books become deeply involved with conquest, politics, and family dynamics both in the less technological cultures of the planet Rhui and in a larger systems-spanning empire in space. Some readers have complained that the first volume is too much like a romance. Hmmm. But don’t worry, there are major battles as well. Hope that helps.

So next was the crossroads series which begins with:

spirit gate

This is hands down me favorite series.  It revolves around the story of Mai and Captain Anji but is so much more.  The main thing that I adore is the reeves, who patrol on enormous eagles.  Add in magical guardian spirits, awesome world building, epic scope, and political intrigue and I was hooked.  The story is told from multiple points of view and I love the characters.  The plot is awesome and the books don’t always go where ye might want them to.  Which is why some readers have issues with this one.  But I loved every turn and thought the ending was perfect.

The book blurb:

For hundreds of years the Guardians have ruled the world of the Hundred, but these powerful gods no longer exert their will on the world. Only the reeves, who patrol on enormous eagles, still represent the Guardians’ power. And the reeves are losing their authority; for there is a dark shadow across the land that not even the reeves can stop.

A group of fanatics has risen to devour villages, towns, and cities in their drive to annihilate all who oppose them. No one knows who leads them; they seem inhumanly cruel and powerful. Mai and Anji, riding with a company of dedicated warriors and a single reeve who may hold a key to stopping the deadly advance of the devouring horde, must try, or the world will be lost to the carnage. But a young woman sworn to the Goddess may prove more important than them all . . . if they are not too late.
A haunting tale of people swept up by the chaos of war, this is superlative fantasy adventure, rich in texture, filled with color and excitement, masterfully crafted by a brilliantly gifted storyteller.”
Then there is the spiritwalker trilogy of which the first book is:

cold magic

This is me least favorite series but not by much.  This is told in first person and Cat makes for a lovely main character.  I loved the world building as usual and thought the first book was amazing.  It’s a alternate history retelling with magic and science.  It has a strong female friendship.  I adore Cat’s relationship with Rory.  He is awesome.  I even love the lawyers!  A wasn’t a fan of the Wild Hunt aspects overall which is why me enjoyment of the later two books was not as high.

The author’s series blurb:

My most recently completed series is the Spiritwalker Trilogy (1: COLD MAGIC, 2: COLD FIRE, 3: COLD STEEL). It is the first novel sequence I wrote in first person, and if you like the distinctive voice of the narrator, Cat Barahal, then it’s likely you’ll enjoy the book. Cat is loyal and impulsive and rash and stubborn and has a tendency to leap before she looks. This is definitely my funniest series, due largely to Cat’s unique way of telling her story and her colorful and often sardonic observations of other people.

I love writing interplay between characters and this trilogy definitely contains some of my best bantering exchanges. It’s a story with female friendship at the center (and what I’m told is a memorable love interest), as well as a fantasia of a gaslamp-era alternate history whose ramifications I’m rather proud of. I call the setting Afro-Celtic post-Roman icepunk fantasy adventure, with Phoenician spies, revolution, and lawyer dinosaurs. It starts a little slow as I set up the world but on the other hand I suspect “starting a little slow” is typical of my work on the whole.

And then there are the series that are works in progress like:

court of fives

This is Kate Elliott’s first young adult series.  I have read the first one and I loved it.  Strong female characters.  A tournament called The Fives.  Awesome.  I haven’t got around to the second yet even though it is out.  The conclusion is out in July 2017.

The author’s series blurb:

My next newest book is also my debut YA fantasy, COURT OF FIVES: In a world of magic and peril, four sisters try to make a difficult transition to adulthood in a society suffocated by rules of class and privilege. Fierce, determined Jes wants nothing more than to make her mark in the most popular game in the country, but disaster is about to strike her family, one that will bring her into stunning contact with her long-buried heritage.

I call this this “Little Women meet American Ninja Warrior in a setting inspired by Greco-Roman Egypt” while the publisher has pitched it as “Little Women meets Game of Thrones meets The Hunger Games.” It’s fast-paced (it has to be, because it’s YA) and my most streamlined world building without, I hope, losing any of the depth and complexity I try to convey. As a woman who started participating in athletics as a girl, I wanted to write a love letter to female athletes and their competitiveness and drive, and I have adored the idea of competitive obstacle courses long before American Ninja Warrior or Tough Mudders and Spartan Runs came on the scene. This trilogy is my way of tossing my love for epic fantasy, sports, and girls in central roles all into one swirling story of intrigue, action, and a touch of romance.

the black wolves

To quote me own review of the first book of the series:

This wonderful novel is set in the Hundred. It is a new trilogy that begins twenty-two years after where her previous Crossroads series ended. If you have not read the Crossroads series first, then I suggest you do because it sets up the political wrangling and world-building that then sets the stage for this novel. The series is damn good besides.

So that be me introduction to Kate Elliott.  If ye haven’t read any of her novels I would suggest ye hoist those sails and get moving!

Don’t know where to start?  Check out the author’s “Where Should I Start With Your Novels?

To visit her website go to:

Kate Elliott – Author

To see a complete list of all books she has written visit:

Kate Elliott – Books

To add this author or her novels to Goodreads go to:

Yer Ports for Plunder List

If ye want to see me other author broadsides:

Garth Nix – No. 1

Sharon Shinn – No. 2

John Scalzi – No. 3

Tamora Pierce – No. 4

Brandon Sanderson – No. 5

Robin McKinley – No. 6

Michael Crichton – No. 7

Mercedes Lackey – No. 8

Dean Kootnz – No. 9

Justine Larbalestier – No. 10

Neil Gaiman – No. 11

Broadside No. 12 – an author advertisement

Hear ye hear ye me mateys!  I announce an additional broadside to me Captain’s log.  What is a broadside ye ask?  Traditionally:

  1. A broadside is the side of a ship, the battery of cannon on one side of a warship; or their coordinated fire in naval warfare. From the 16th century until the early decades of the steamship, vessels had rows of guns set in each side of the hull. Firing all guns on one side of the ship became known as a “broadside“. source
  2. A broadside is a large sheet of paper printed on one side only. Historically, broadsides were posters, announcing events or proclamations, or simply advertisements. source

What does this mean for me mateys?  Well tomorrow I will publish the twelfth edition of me broadside that will highlight a specific favorite author and their work.  Who ye ask?  It’s a surprise . . .

Broadside No. 11 – Neil Gaiman

Ahoy there me mateys!  Welcome to the eleventh broadside – the Neil Gaiman edition.  Most of me crew has likely heard of him but on the off chance ye haven’t well then take a look.  Now Mr. Gaiman is a pretty prolific author and apparently was named by the Dictionary of Literary Biography as one of the top ten living post-modern writers.  He writes comics, novels, films, articles, children’s books, and a whole lot more.  This being me book blog, I am going to focus on his novels.  I have read 7 of them as well as some of the collected short story collections.  While I haven’t loved everything by him, I always enjoy his style.

Please note: All book descriptions are taken directly from the author’s website and the book title links lead to Goodreads.

neverwhere

I admit that for a long time I had never heard of Mr. Gaiman.  Then one day I spotted this.  It sounded odd and interesting.  I began reading it and was transported into the underworld of London.  It is gritty and dark and suspenseful.  But what stood out was the writing.  It didn’t feel like anything I had read before (at that time anyway) and I was hooked.  I devoured this one and wanted more.  The book blurb:

Richard Mayhew is an unassuming young businessman living in London, with a dull job and a pretty but demanding fiancee. Then one night he stumbles across a girl bleeding on the sidewalk. He stops to help her–and the life he knows vanishes like smoke.

Several hours later, the girl is gone too. And by the following morning Richard Mayhew has been erased from his world. His bank cards no longer work, taxi drivers won’t stop for him, his landlord rents his apartment out to strangers. He has become invisible, and inexplicably consigned to a London of shadows and darkness a city of monsters and saints, murderers and angels, that exists entirely in a subterranean labyrinth of sewer canals and abandoned subway stations. He has fallen through the cracks of reality and has landed somewhere different, somewhere that is Neverwhere.

For this is the home of Door, the mysterious girl whom Richard rescued in the London Above. A personage of great power and nobility in this murky, candlelit realm, she is on a mission to discover the cause of her family’s slaughter, and in doing so preserve this strange underworld kingdom from the malevolence that means to destroy it. And with nowhere else to turn, Richard Mayhew must now join the Lady Door’s entourage in their determined–and possibly fatal–quest . . .

So the next book I read

american gods

Okay so while I adored this book, I have to admit I do not really know how to describe it.  It is long and dense and fascinating with mixes of myth, religion, reality, and lots inbetween.  The road trip in this novel was awesome and I looked up a lot of the places as I was reading.  The book blurb:

Released from prison, Shadow finds his world turned upside down. His wife has been killed; a mysterious stranger offers him a job. But Mr. Wednesday, who knows more about Shadow than is possible, warns that a storm is coming — a battle for the very soul of America . . . and they are in its direct path.

One of the most talked-about books of the new millennium, American Gods is a kaleidoscopic journey deep into myth and across an American landscape at once eerily familiar and utterly alien. It is, quite simply, a contemporary masterpiece.

  • Hugo Award for Best SF/Fantasy Novel
  • Bram Stoker Award for Best Horror Novel
  • Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel
  • Nebula Award for Best Novel

the graveyard book

A toddler loses his family and wanders into a graveyard.  The ghosts and other inhabitants agree to raise him.  Nobody Owens, known as Bod, cannot leave the graveyard for his own safety.  But can he truly live there forever?  I adored this one.  The blurb:

Bod is an unusual boy who inhabits an unusual place-he’s the only living resident of a graveyard. Raised from infancy by the ghosts, werewolves, and other cemetery denizens, Bod has learned the antiquated customs of his guardians’ time as well as their timely ghostly teachings-like the ability to Fade. Can a boy raised by ghosts face the wonders and terrors of the worlds of both the living and the dead? And then there are things like ghouls that aren’t really one thing or the other.

And then of course you have this:

coraline

This book scared grown adults.  A little girl named Coraline, goes through a door to a world that seems like her own only better.  But is it?  It didn’t scare me but I loved the story and the illustrations.  And of course it has an awesome cat as a sidekick.  I also hear the movie is good.  The book blurb:

When Coraline steps through a door to find another house strangely similar to her own (only better), things seem marvelous.

But there’s another mother there, and another father, and they want her to stay and be their little girl. They want to change her and never let her go.

Coraline will have to fight with all her wits and courage if she is to save herself and return to her ordinary life.

  • Publishers Weekly Best Book (WINNER)
  • Book Sense 76 Pick (WINNER)
  • Child Magazine Best Book of the Year (WINNER)
  • New York Public Library’s “One Hundred Titles for Reading and Sharing” (WINNER)
  • Amazon.com Editors’ Choice (WINNER)
  • ALA Notable Children’s Book (WINNER)
  • ALA Best Book for Young Adults (WINNER)
  • New York Public Library Books for the Teen Age (WINNER)
  • IRA/CBC Children’s Choice (WINNER)
  • Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children’s Book Award Masterlist (Vermont) (WINNER)
  • Bram Stoker Award for Best Work for Young Readers (WINNER)
  • Hugo Award for Best Novella (WINNER)
  • School Library Journal Best Book (WINNER)

Sheesh lots of awards huh?  So that be me introduction to Neil Gaiman .  If ye haven’t read any of his novels I would suggest ye hoist those sails and get moving!

To visit her website go to:

Neil Gaiman – Author

To see a complete list of all books he has written visit:

Neil Gaiman – Books

To add this author or his novels to Goodreads go to:

Yer Ports for Plunder List

If ye want to see me other author broadsides:

Garth Nix – No. 1

Sharon Shinn – No. 2

John Scalzi – No. 3

Tamora Pierce – No. 4

Brandon Sanderson – No. 5

Robin McKinley – No. 6

Michael Crichton – No. 7

Mercedes Lackey – No. 8

Dean Kootnz – No. 9

Justine Larbalestier – No. 10

Broadside No. 11 – an author advertisement

Hear ye hear ye me mateys!  I announce an additional broadside to me Captain’s log.  What is a broadside ye ask?  Traditionally:

  1. A broadside is the side of a ship, the battery of cannon on one side of a warship; or their coordinated fire in naval warfare. From the 16th century until the early decades of the steamship, vessels had rows of guns set in each side of the hull. Firing all guns on one side of the ship became known as a “broadside“. source
  2. A broadside is a large sheet of paper printed on one side only. Historically, broadsides were posters, announcing events or proclamations, or simply advertisements. source

What does this mean for me mateys?  Well tomorrow I will publish the eleventh edition of me broadside that will highlight a specific favorite author and their work.  Who ye ask?  It’s a surprise . . .

Broadside No. 10 – Justine Larbalestier

Ahoy there me mateys!  Welcome to the tenth broadside – the Justine Larbalestier edition.  She has written 8 books and edited one anthology (excluding non-fiction).  Now surprisingly, I have somehow not read her trilogy but I have read 3 of her novels and the anthology.  Now the catch is that her books have been very varied in subject matter and so far I have given them all five stars!  Oh and she is from Australia . . . so bonus.

Please note: All book descriptions are taken directly from Goodreads and the book title links lead to Goodreads.

how to ditch your fairy

I have no idea where I first saw this novel but with a title like that I had to look into it.  I also remember it taking forever to get this book in me hands.  It takes place in Australia where everyone has their own personal fairy.  But Charlie doesn’t like hers.  This book deals with what happens when you try to get rid of your fairy.  It was silly and wonderful and filled with fun made up slang.  The book blurb:

Welcome to New Avalon, where everyone has a personal fairy. Though invisible to the naked eye, a personal fairy — like a specialized good luck charm — is vital to a person’s success. It might determine whether you make a sports team, pass a class, or find that perfect outfit. But for fourteen-year-old Charlie, having a parking fairy is worse than having nothing at all — especially when the school bully carts her around like his private parking pass.

Enter: The Plan. At first, teaming up with her archenemy Fiorenze (who has an all-the-boys-like-you fairy), seems like a great idea. But when Charlie unexpectedly gets her heart’s desire, it isn’t at all how she thought it would be, and she’ll have resort to extraordinary measures to set things right.

I simply adored this one and so I wanted to see what else she had written.  I found this:

Liar

The narrator is a liar and this is her story.  The only thing I can say without ruining things for a reader is that Micah is definitely unreliable.  Yet the twists and turns in the telling of the story were fantastic.  I still ponder the ramifications of this one.  The book blurb:

Micah will freely admit that she’s a compulsive liar, but that may be the one honest thing she’ll ever tell you. Over the years she’s duped her classmates, her teachers, and even her parents, and she’s always managed to stay one step ahead of her lies. That is, until her boyfriend dies under brutal circumstances and her dishonesty begins to catch up with her. But is it possible to tell the truth when lying comes as naturally as breathing? Taking readers deep into the psyche of a young woman who will say just about anything to convince them—and herself—that she’s finally come clean, Liar is a bone-chilling thriller that will have readers see-sawing between truths and lies right up to the end. Honestly.

Razorhurst

This book was inspired by Frog Hollow in Surry Hills a suburb of Sydney.  Apparently in the 1930s and 40s, “according to [the] Sydney tabloid Truth, the streets were crowded with ‘bottle men, dope pedlars, razor slashers, sneak thieves, confidence men, women of ill repute, pickpockets, burglars, spielers, gunmen and every brand of racecourse parasite.'” This novel takes place in the era and is part mob story, part ghost story, and just part crazy.  I loved it.  The blurb:

The setting: Razorhurst, 1932. The fragile peace between two competing mob bosses—Gloriana Nelson and Mr Davidson—is crumbling. Loyalties are shifting. Betrayals threaten.

Kelpie knows the dangers of the Sydney streets. Ghosts have kept her alive, steering her to food and safety, but they are also her torment.

Dymphna is Gloriana Nelson’s ‘best girl’, experienced in surviving the criminal world, but she doesn’t know what this day has in store for her.

When Dymphna meets Kelpie over the corpse of Jimmy Palmer, Dymphna’s latest boyfriend, she pronounces herself Kelpie’s new protector. But Dymphna’s life is in danger too, and she needs an ally. And while Jimmy’s ghost wants to help, the dead cannot protect the living . . .

So that’s the three extremely different novels that made me fall in love with this author’s writing style.  And then of course you have this:

Zombies Vs. Unicorns

This book is an anthology edited by Justine Larbalestier and Holly Black.  It is a short story collection that tries to determine whether zombies or unicorns are better.  The editors each pick a side and have snarky commentary through the book defending their choices.  The stories are awesome.  The book blurb:

It’s a question as old as time itself: which is better, the zombie or the unicorn? In this anthology, edited by Holly Black and Justine Larbalestier (unicorn and zombie, respectively), strong arguments are made for both sides in the form of short stories. Half of the stories portray the strengths–for good and evil–of unicorns and half show the good (and really, really bad-ass) side of zombies. Contributors include many bestselling teen authors, including Cassandra Clare, Libba Bray, Maureen Johnson, Meg Cabot, Scott Westerfeld, and Margo Lanagan. This anthology will have everyone asking: Team Zombie or Team Unicorn?

So that be me introduction to Justine Larbalestier .  If ye haven’t read any of her novels I would suggest ye hoist those sails and get moving!

To visit her website go to:

Justine Larbalestier – Author

To see a complete list of all books she has written visit:

Justine Larbalestier – Books

To add this author or her novels to Goodreads go to:

Yer Ports for Plunder List

If ye want to see me other author broadsides:

Garth Nix – No. 1

Sharon Shinn – No. 2

John Scalzi – No. 3

Tamora Pierce – No. 4

Brandon Sanderson – No. 5

Robin McKinley – No. 6

Michael Crichton – No. 7

Mercedes Lackey – No. 8

Dean Kootnz – No. 9

Broadside No. 10 – an author advertisement

Hear ye hear ye me mateys!  I announce an additional broadside to me Captain’s log.  What is a broadside ye ask?  Traditionally:

  1. A broadside is the side of a ship, the battery of cannon on one side of a warship; or their coordinated fire in naval warfare. From the 16th century until the early decades of the steamship, vessels had rows of guns set in each side of the hull. Firing all guns on one side of the ship became known as a “broadside“. source
  2. A broadside is a large sheet of paper printed on one side only. Historically, broadsides were posters, announcing events or proclamations, or simply advertisements. source

What does this mean for me mateys?  Well tomorrow I will publish the tenth edition of me broadside that will highlight a specific favorite author and their work.  Who ye ask?  It’s a surprise . . .

Broadside No. 9 – Dean Koontz

Ahoy there me mateys!  Welcome to the ninth broadside – the Dean Koontz edition.  I started reading these books when I was a wee young’un around the age of 11.  Most people would classify him as a horror writer but in me mind his novels tend to be more sci-fi or thrillers.  He has written over 115 novels in addition to numerous novellas and graphic novels.  I have read 59 of them.  I have to admit that I be most partial to his older work.  Also the majority of his work involves standalones, which I love.  So I will be sharin’ me top five novels by this author that I re-read over and over again..

Please note: All book descriptions are taken directly from the author’s website.  The book title links lead to Goodreads.

Watchers

This book started me love of Dean Koontz books.  On one side ye have a super intelligent golden retriever and on the other a monster.  The two are linked and Travis is drawn into the mystery.  The unraveling of the secrets was awesome.  Dogs are a major theme in a lot of Koontz books and I adored the dog in this book and wished I could have him in real life..  The book blurb:

On his thirty-sixth birthday, Travis Cornell hikes into the foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains. But his path is soon blocked by a bedraggled Golden Retriever, who will let him go no further into the dark woods.

That morning, Travis had been desperate to find some happiness in his lonely, seemingly cursed life. What he finds is a friend, a dog of alarming intelligence and a threat that could only have come from the darkest corners of man’s imagination.

Lightning

This novel involves a “guardian angel” and time travel.  The book also involves a strong wonderful woman which always makes me smile.  Oh and the plot twists were awesome.  The book blurb:

In the midst of a raging blizzard, lightning struck on the night Laura Shane was born. And a mysterious blond-haired stranger showed up just in time to save her from dying.

Years later, in the wake of another storm, Laura will be saved again. For someone is watching over her. But just as lightning illuminates, darkness always follows close behind.

Fear Nothing and Seize the Night

Okay so this is two books but the both involve the character Christopher Snow and the details of the two books are intertwined in me mind such that I cannot separate the facts.  Perhaps it is time to re-read them.  These novels also contain super intelligent creatures and mysteries.  The blurb (from Goodreads):

Christopher Snow is different from all the other residents of Moonlight Bay, different from anyone you’ve ever met. For Christopher Snow has made his peace with a very rare genetic disorder shared by only one thousand other Americans, a disorder that leaves him dangerously vulnerable to light. His life is filled with the fascinating rituals of one who must embrace the dark. He knows the night as no one else ever will, ever can – the mystery, the beauty, the many terrors, and the eerie, silken rhythms of the night – for it is only at night that he is free. Until the night he witnesses a series of disturbing incidents that sweep him into a violent mystery only he can solve, a mystery that will force him to rise above all fears and confront the many-layered strangeness of Moonlight Bay and its residents.

Mr. Murder

This book is super suspenseful.  One of me favorite parts of this novel are the stories that Martin tells his daughters about Santa’s Evil Twin.  Delightful.   The book blurb:

Martin Stillwater has a vivid imagination. It charms his loving wife, delights his two little daughters, and gives him all the inspiration he needs to write his highly successful mystery novels. But maybe Martin’s imagination is a bit too vivid… One rainy afternoon, a terrifying incident makes him question his grip on reality. A stranger breaks into his house, accusing Martin of stealing his wife, his children—and his life. Claiming to be the real Martin Stillwater, the intruder threatens to take what is rightfully his. The police think he’s a figment of Martin’s imagination. But Martin and his family have no choice but to believe the stranger’s threat. And run for their lives.

But wherever they go–wherever they hide–he finds them…

Odd Thomas

This is the first book in the Odd Thomas series but the way the book ends means that it can be read as a standalone.  It is a wonderful book involving dead spirits, a fry cook in a small town, and Elvis.  There are 7 books and two novellas in this series.  I have only read 4 of the books and one novella.  Personally, while I adore Odd, I have liked each subsequent book in the series less and less.  I kinda wish I would have stopped with book one.  However I seem to be in the minority on that. The book blurb:

“The dead don’t talk. I don’t know why.” But they do try to communicate, with a short-order cook in a small desert town serving as their reluctant confidant. Odd Thomas thinks of himself as an ordinary guy, if possessed of a certain measure of talent at the Pico Mundo Grill and rapturously in love with the most beautiful girl in the world, Stormy Llewellyn. Maybe he has a gift, maybe it’s a curse, Odd has never been sure, but he tries to do his best by the silent souls who seek him out. Sometimes they want justice, and Odd’s otherworldly tips to Pico Mundo’s sympathetic police chief, Wyatt Porter, can solve a crime. Occasionally they can prevent one. But this time it’s different. A mysterious man comes to town with a voracious appetite, a filing cabinet stuffed with information on the world’s worst killers, and a pack of hyena-like shades following him wherever he goes. Who the man is and what he wants, not even Odd’s deceased informants can tell him. His most ominous clue is a page ripped from a day-by-day calendar for August 15.

Today is August 14.

In less than twenty-four hours, Pico Mundo will awaken to a day of catastrophe. As evil coils under the searing desert sun, Odd travels through the shifting prisms of his world, struggling to avert a looming cataclysm with the aid of his soul mate and an unlikely community of allies that includes the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll. His account of two shattering days when past and present, fate and destiny converge is the stuff of our worst nightmares—and a testament by which to live: sanely if not safely, with courage, humor, and a full heart that even in the darkness must persevere.

So that be me introduction to Dean Koontz.  Many of his novels have also been made into films (though I have never seen any!).  If ye haven’t read any of his novels I would suggest ye hoist those sails and get moving!

To visit his website go to:

Dean Koontz – Author

To see a complete list of all books he has written visit:

Dean Koontz – Books

To add this author or his novels to Goodreads go to:

Yer Ports for Plunder List

If ye want to see me other author broadsides:

Garth Nix – No. 1

Sharon Shinn – No. 2

John Scalzi – No. 3

Tamora Pierce – No. 4

Brandon Sanderson – No. 5

Robin McKinley – No. 6

Michael Crichton – No. 7

Mercedes Lackey – No. 8